eBook

Kindle Paperwhite 3G Review: Finally a Worthy Successor to the Kindle 2

I will gladly admit that I've been a fan of ebook readers from the day the very first Kindle was announced. In fact, I've always been a collector of books and while I do prefer real books in hardcover or paperback form in my library at home, there just isn't anything that could possibly beat an ebook reader for the convenience of bringing several books with me on a trip or for the ability to read a book in bed under low-light conditions, or reading a couple of books on the beach on a sunny summer day, or buying a new book instantly online when I'm finished with the previous one.

So I was truly delighted when my new Kindle paperwhite 3G arrived today. I had always loved the original Kindle in 2007 and the Kindle 2 that I had bought in 2009, because both devices had an e-ink display that was easily viewable in bright daylight conditions as well as indoors. By contrast, I felt that the Kindle Fire was a big disappointment when it first came out. In fact, while I had bought one at that time, it ended up somewhere in a pile of unused electronic gadgets very quickly. It was neither good enough as a tablet computer to truly compete with the iPad, nor was the screen any advantage when reading a book, and the battery life was just too short. In fact, I kept reading my books either on the Kindle 2 (outdoors) or on the iPad (indoors) for the last couple of years.

Kindle paperwhite

But the new Kindle paperwhite changes all of that.



Returning to the concept of an e-ink display, the device is again fabulously suitable for daylight reading on the beach on a bright sunny day, yet it also has a subtly lit display that is perfect for low-light conditions and indoor reading at night. The device is extremely light and they got the form-factor just right. Getting rid of the physical keyboard from the Kindle 2 model and replacing it with a touch-screen helped to shrink the form factor considerably and makes reading books on the device that much more comfortable than reading them on an iPad. I cannot wait to see if the advertised battery life of 8 weeks really holds up in real-world reading and usage.

The font choices have been expanded and the high resolution of the display makes reading a real pleasure - even if you switch to a small font-size (if your eyes are still good). Alternatively, you can opt for a larger line spacing and bigger fonts if your eyes get tired more quickly.

As always, the device is directly linked to your Amazon.com account and you can download books form the cloud onto your device easily via the built-in Wi-Fi or free 3G networks. And in addition to highlighting paragraphs and adding notes for your own purposes, you can also share passages with friends via Twitter and Facebook integration. And you can continue to send PDF files and Word documents to a special device- and user-specific @kindle.com email address to read these on your Kindle.

However, I found it a bit disappointing that Amazon has once again failed to include support for ePub publications in their latest device, given that this open electronic book publishing format is fully supported by Adobe, Apple, and many other industry players.

Bottom-line: great form-factor, perfect screen resolution and readability in direct sunlight as well as low-light conditions due to advanced e-ink technology with backlight display. This will be a permanent travel companion for all my future trips.

P.S. I would recommend opting for the 3G model "without special offers". For just $20 more you can get rid of annoying advertising in the Kindle Store screen as well as the sleep-mode display. However, you can also buy the cheaper model first to see whether you find the ads annoying and then later pay $20 on your credit card to "upgrade" your device to get rid of them.

P.P.S. You may ask what is on my reading list on the new Kindle paperwhite? Presently I'm continuing "Chapterhouse: Dune" by Frank Herbert, which I had last read some 12-13 years ago and decided to re-read recently. In fact, I decided to re-read the entire Dune cycle this summer, and have now reached this book. Next I have "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand on my list, followed by some Neal Stephenson novels and "The Intelligent Investor" by Benjamin Graham.

iPad Review

With all the hype surrounding the iPad this weekend, I decided to wait a bit and only write about it on Monday. This was also just a picture-perfect weekend with ideal weather in New England and the Red Sox Opening Day on Sunday, so I spent most of my time outdoors rather than playing with or writing about the iPad.

Being a technology geek I had, of course, pre-ordered my iPad a while ago and so it arrived on Saturday via UPS truck as promised. The truck driver jokingly remarked that he had a full truck of just iPads to deliver and he wished he had bought Apple stock a while ago. The first sales data that Apple reported today does indeed sound promising.

But is the iPad really a new “magical” device as Apple likes to describe it? Or is it the beginning of a dystopian future where Apple controls what we are allowed to see, the apps that are approved, and the end of an open Internet (as some pundits claim)?

I won’t bore you with unboxing details that others have reported before, or give you a detailed guide to the best applications you should download to your new iPad.

Instead, I will distill the benefits of the iPad down to the one product image that explains it all:

Marvel Comics on iPad

Yes, the iPad is a primarily a media consumption device. Think of that cozy armchair in your living room, or the sofa, or the couch, or a bench in your backyard. Anywhere you would sit down with a good book to read. Have you tried using a laptop in any of those spots? It doesn’t quite work. Laptops are – despite their name – really only useful when you put them on a hotel room desk or airplane tray table.

By contrast, the iPad is really made for consuming media wherever and whenever you don’t want to sit at a desk! Now, in addition to reading books from the iBooks or Kindle bookstores, you can also read comics by Marvel (see image above), consume newspapers in digital editions, catch up on TV that you missed, watch movies you buy or rent on iTunes or Netflix, and browse the web. And if you are one of those always-connected people (like me) you can even read your e-mail and respond to the occasional important one, or access one of the many social networking sites or apps.

And it does all of that extremely well – to the point where it is indeed a new class of device and since everything just works and is super fast, it really has a certain “magical” feel to it. In fact, when I showed some of these apps to my family this weekend, I immediately got requests for additional iPads that they now want me to buy…

iBooks on iPad The one iPad app that is of great interest to this XML Aficionado is, of course, the iBooks app, which is both a very pretty e-Book reader and also a bookstore where you can buy these e-Books directly from Apple. The interesting thing about iBooks is that apple decided to support the open ePub file format for e-Books rather than a proprietary format like the Kindle. As you may have guessed already, ePub is XML-based and the content can be provided in either XHTML or DTBook format. The result is that with the launch of the iBooks bookstore there are not only a few publishers who have already signed up, but you also get a ton of works in the public domain, whose copyright has expired, and you can download all of them for free from the iBooks bookstore. 

WolframAlpha on iPad Above and beyond that, the iPad is really a great educational tool. Using WolframAlpha on the iPad is just a joy and there are also new apps, like The Elements: A Visual Exploration that are really beautifully made.

Yes, there are also some business applications, like Keynote for presentation, Pages for word processing, and Numbers for spreadsheet-type work. Those are really very pretty and easy to use and will certainly be useful for some people, but I am guessing these are more attractive for people who don’t have a laptop and, therefore, want to use the iPad for that purpose, too.

Regarding the iPad hardware: the device fits comfortably in your hand and even though it is a bit heavier than the Kindle, it just feels right. The screen is really beautiful and the colors are vibrant. I used the device for several hours on Saturday and Sunday and the battery life was much better than expected. And it is really fast and responsive. I didn’t find any feature or app where I had to “wait for the computer”. Very refreshing, indeed!

So should you buy an iPad now? That decision is entirely up to you, but this flowchart might help. All kidding aside, if you are an early adopter, like new technologies, and have the money to spend, I would go for it. Likewise, if you are considering buying a Kindle or a PSP, I would buy an iPad instead. However, if you don’t yet have an iPhone and are trying to decide between iPad and iPhone, I would probably rather go with the iPhone – in my opinion it is the more versatile device.

multi_touch_20100225 There is another group of people, for whom the iPad is probably ideal: those of the older generation, who have not yet bought any computer. The iPad is certainly the most gentle way for a senior to get access to e-mail, web browsing, and sharing photos with the younger generations. If you want your parents or grandparents to finally “get connected”, then a broadband Internet connection with wireless router plus an iPad is probably the best solution out there.

Are there any negative things to say about the iPad? I’m afraid not many. There is, of course, the one issue that developers of applications for the iPad are totally dependent upon Apple with respect to whether the apps can be sold through the app store, since Apple has a mandatory approval process and can reject any app for any reason. Tim Bray, co-author and editor of the XML specification, has been very outspoken about that issue and recently said:

“The iPhone vision of the mobile Internet’s future omits controversy, sex, and freedom, but includes strict limits on who can know what and who can say what. It’s a sterile Disney-fied walled garden surrounded by sharp-toothed lawyers. The people who create the apps serve at the landlord’s pleasure and fear his anger.

I hate it.

I hate it even though the iPhone hardware and software are great, because freedom’s not just another word for anything, nor is it an optional ingredient.”

The same is true for the iPad as much as for the iPhone. On the one hand I agree with Tim about freedom not being optional, on the other hand there are very few apps that Apple rejected that I would miss (Google Voice being the only one I can think of right now). The one benefit of Apple’s tight control over the app store is the total lack of viruses and malware on the iPhone/iPad platform. And it adds a layer of QA on top of most applications, so the software you buy in the app store typically works and is useful.

The second issue with the iPad that is worth mentioning is that there are apparently some Wi-Fi issues that people have reported. I haven’t seen any of those problems myself - either at home or in the office - and the iPad has been flawless in its ability to connect to the Internet anywhere I tried.

Finally, for those who are not convinced and would rather want to see the iPad being abused, there are already some interesting videos out there…

Amazon Kindle 2 Review

My Kindle 2 arrived from Amazon today! It appears that I am lucky in this respect, because Amazon had originally announced the ship date as February 25th, and most people are still waiting for their unit to show up. But I had ordered mine literally within 10 minutes of the announcement - so I guess being an early adopter finally got awarded...

As I had promised a few weeks ago, I am providing a review of the new Kindle 2 as a follow-up to my popular original Kindle Review from November 2007. Just like with the previous review, this one is based on unpacking the Kindle 2 and working with the device for about 2-3 hours. I plan to add information about long-term issues such as battery-life in a future blog posting once I have accumulated several days of usage of the Kindle 2.

Unpacking the Kindle 2 is fun. Just like the Kindle 1 the packaging is well-designed and this  resembles a shipping box with a "tear here to open" strip on one side. The package contains the Kindle itself, a thin "Read me" brochure, and the charging cable. The screen of the device shows instructions to plug it in and then push the power switch on top of the unit - for those that hate even the shortest of manuals.

Once you turn the Kindle 2 on, you immediately get to read the User's Guide on the screen, or you can skip ahead and press the Home button to get to your main library page.

Before I talk about the improvements in the software, let's take a look at all the improvements in the hardware of the device compared to the Kindle 1:

  • The Kindle 2 looks much more polished or refined and gets rid of some of the edginess of the original unit. It feels more "solid" and less flimsy, which may also be due to the fact that it is about 10g heavier (468g with book cover for the Kindle 2 compared to 458g for the Kindle 1).
  • The Kindle 2 now locks into place in the book cover / sleeve that you can order from Amazon. The original Kindle fell out of that cover far too often, so this is a great improvement.
  • Another annoying "feature" of the Kindle 1 is now a thing of the past, too: accidental clicks on the Next or Prev buttons. The buttons on the Kindle 2 are still on the very edge of the unit, but the buttons now have their pivot point on the outside edge and need to be clicked inward, which completely prevents accidental clicking. Very clever design change!
  • The new Kindle 2 gets rid of the shiny silvery and strange LCD sidebar that the old unit used to provide a selection cursor on the page or within a menu. Since the new display is much faster and more responsive, the selection feedback is now directly shown on the main screen.
  • The Kindle 2 has a better position for the power switch (top left of the unit) and gets rid of clumsy wireless on/off hardware switch on back of unit, too.
  • It comes with a better power adapter (mini USB plug on Kindle, charger cable can either use desktop USB plug or wall outlet), which is similar to what the iPhone charger from Apple does.
  • I'm lucky to be in a Spring 3G network coverage area, and so I found the unit to have much faster downloads using Amazon 3G Whispernet (only in areas where 3G EVDO service is available). This was especially noticeable when I downloaded all my previous purchases to the new device.
  • The new 16-grayscale display is great, especially for viewing web content, such as Wikipedia, newspapers, or blogs. It's probably not the most important feature, but certainly nice to have and much easier on the eyes than the old display when rendering images.
  • I never really liked the hardware on/off switch in the back or the sleep mode on the old Kindle, but this is now all much more user friendly and consistent: wake-up from sleep mode is now done using power-button instead of "Alt-AA", and it is much more responsive; pushing the power button briefly puts Kindle in sleep mode (artwork screen saver is shown); and pushing the power button for 4-5 sec turns the Kindle off.

In addition to these hardware changes, the Kindle 2 also apparently offers some improved software that contains several usability enhancements. Some of those are more network features and I assume they will be available as an upgrade on the old units, too, but I haven't heard any details about such an upgrade yet. Anyway, here are the software enhancements that I found notable:

  • The first positive surprise was how easy it was to migrate books from my old to the new Kindle. There are essentially two different upgrade paths: you can either just turn on the new Kindle and from the home page access "Archived Items" and it will show you all previously purchased books that are available in your Amazon account and you can download them right there. Alternatively, you can user your computer to go to the Amazon.com website and use the "Manage your Kindle" page to view a list of all your previously purchased Kindle books and send them to the new Kindle from that list.
  • The Kindle 2 apparently has a faster processor, so it comes with Text-to-Speech software built in. You can turn this on from the font-size menu or from the main menu, and you can customize reading speed as well as male/female voice. A nice feature is that the Kindle auto-turns the pages for you if you are using Text-to-Speech so you can still follow the text as it is being read to you. A neat feature, but the Text-to-Speech engine makes the usual pronunciation errors...
  • Another neat feature is the ability to sync devices, if you have more than 1 Kindle. This lets you read a book on one device and then continue from the exact same page on another device, if they are both linked to your Amazon account.
  • The search function now offers 6 choices: search my items (i.e. all books, documents, subscriptions on the Kindle locally); search the kindle store; search google; search dictionary; search wikipedia; and go to web, which lets you enter a URL. The same choices are also directly available from the address bar in the built-in browser, which seems to have gotten some improvements in usability.

So much for the positive experiences with the new Kindle 2. But not everything is perfect and there are a few disappointments that I experienced when playing with the device on the first day:

Mainly, the built-in browser still leaves much to be desired. It is not quite clear to me why it is not built on WebKit like Safari or Chrome to provide proper rendering of HTML pages. If a device like the iPhone that is less than half the Kindle's screen size can render web pages beautifully and accurately, then why can't the Kindle? This is a very bothersome oversight - especially when open source browser packages are readily available in the form of FireFox or WebKit.

Another issue: no doubt it is great that one can shop in the Kindle Store on Amazon.com using the Kindle, which allows you to buy new books on the road and has been a feature of the Kindle 1 from the start (see left). But the world has changed since November of 2007! On my iPhone I can use the Amazon.com iPhone app today and shop all of Amazon.com - not just the Kindle store. Why can I not order a DVD from my Kindle or shop for new electronic gadgets? It doesn't make any sense to just limit the Kindle application to shopping for Kindle books only....

Also, Amazon has unfortunately failed to address the following points that I had raised in my initial Kindle 1 Review over a year ago:

  • It is great that I can send PDF and Word docs to my Kindle via my personalized kindle.com e-mail address. But that is not enough. When I place annotations, notes, and highlights in such documents on my Kindle, I now want to be able to e-mail them back to my office e-mail address and I want to see those comments, annotations, notes, and highlights back in the Word or PDF doc so that I can send it to others in the company. This would allow me to use the Kindle for actually reviewing business documents – it would be fantastic!!!
  • How can I get additional blogs on the Kindle? I am happy to pay extra, but I want to be able to enter any RSS feeder URL into my Amazon account and create a Kindle blog feed for it. Blog authors can now sign up with Amazon to publish their blogs on Kindle, but as a consumer I would like to be able to pick a niche blog and pay for it myself - that still doesn't work.
  • It would be nice, if Amazon could integrate some Social Networking aspects into the Kindle. How many of my friends are reading books on it? What are they reading? How can I post comments about a book to my blog? How can I tell my friends about comments I have on a book?

Last, but not least, I wanted to test whether the Kindle 2 can now receive and process Open Office XML (OOXML) documents via the personalized e-mail address, and I was indeed able to receive, read, and review a DOCX document in WordprocessingML that I had created from an XML source with Altova StyleVision 2009.

So the overall verdict is: definitely a great improvement over the first generation Kindle, and still one of the best eBook readers in my opinion. But it leaves a few things to be desired - especially in the iPhone-age....

Is it worth to upgrade from the Kindle 1? I would say only if you have kids or other family members whom you plan to give the Kindle 1 unit to. The improvements from the Kindle 1 are certainly nice, but they are more incremental than revolutionary.


UPDATE: The Kindle's Secret has been revealed by XKCD:


Kindle 2 announced today

I just got this message when I logged into amazon.com today, and it appears that the Kindle 2 has indeed arrived:

Kindle2

Needless to say, I already pre-ordered two units. The kids will get our Kindle 1 devices as "hand-me-downs". Yes, I am happy to admit that I'm an early adopter when it comes to the Kindle - see my initial review of the Kindle on this blog, and most of what I said back then still holds true. I will also post a review here once I actually receive the Kindle 2 device - Amazon has promised it for February 25th. Hey, Amazon: are you listening? Send it to me tomorrow, and I'll review it earlier... :-)

Obviously, techmeme is abuzz with different blog reactions, and I found this story in the Wall Street Journal today very informative, too.

Golden Compass Movie Sneak Preview

We got to see a sneak preview of the upcoming Golden Compass movie today - six days before it opens nationwide in cinemas. The movie is certainly beautiful to watch - the renditions of some of the technological marvels of that other universe are elaborate and impressive. And the acting isn't bad either. However, the shape-shifting of the kids' dæmons was quite disappointing (they shift so fast that you don't get to see any nice CGI-transitions at all). And the story has been brutally mangled as it was turned into a screenplay: important aspects of character-development are missing, entire sections of certain chapters are missing (e.g. the ambassador of the witches), the sequence of events has been overturned (e.g. Bolvangar vs. fight of the bears for the throne), and the end has been turned from a breath-taking, earth-shattering, and tearing-the-sky-open cliff-hanger into a mediocre happy ending, Hollywood-style.

Furthermore it appears that the Authority still has a strong grip on affairs in our universe: the movie doesn't dare to criticize the Church and only calls it the "Magisterium" and even the church buildings in the movie have only a fleeting resemblance to cathedrals and look more like a cross between Metropolis and greenhouses.

Nonetheless, one of the positive things about the movie is that you can visit the movie website and do a quick test to meet your own dæmon - here is a picture of mine, and her name is Hypatia:

GoldenCompass_Hypatia_Cropped

I really like that tiger - I think I'm going to keep my dæmon.

So what it all boils down to is this: I recently read the entire His Dark Materials trilogy on the Sony Reader (a few months before the Kindle came out) and the Golden Compass book is just so much better than the movie. If you haven't read it yet, do yourself a favor and get the book before you watch the movie!

Amazon Kindle Review

UPDATE February 24, 2009: I've received my new Kindle 2 today and posted a detailed review of the new Kindle 2 on this blog.


Being a gadget aficionado, I placed my order for the Kindle yesterday when it was announced and promptly received the new device today. I've now spent about 3-4 hours with the Kindle, including reading a book at the hair dresser, having my hair stylist and friend recommend Anne McCaffrey's Talents series to me, and using the Kindle right then and there to promptly buy Pegasus in Flight and have it download to my Kindle wirelessly within a minute.

But before I begin with this review, let's put a few things straight: (a) I love books - my parents have always had tons of them, my wife and I have thousands of them, and I will never give up paper books; (b) this review is not being paid for by anyone (however, if you click on a link to Amazon.com from this site and then purchase something, I will earn a small percentage under he Amazon Associates program); (c) I've started using the original Sony Reader over a year ago and just upgraded to the newest Sony Reader about 2 months ago - the reason is that I travel a lot and I like to read when I'm traveling, but I don't like to either lug around 5-6 books with me or run out of reading materials during a trip.

To make things interesting, I purchased a few books and a couple of magazine subscriptions for the Kindle through the Kindle Store yesterday after placing my order for the device. Amazon promised that these would "magically" be delivered to my device once I unpacked it.

So when the package arrived today and I unpacked it this evening after coming home from work, I was immediately surprised by the lightweight nature of the Kindle. I had expected it to be heavier based on the leaked photos, but it is actually quite light - it appears to even be lighter than the Sony Reader. The package is a bit of an homage to the Apple iPod (as is the white color of the Kindle, the power supply, the cables, etc). Luckily the book cover that you can attach the device to is still black!

Kindle The actual Kindle is not even half as ugly as the previously leaked photos seemed to imply. The alphabetic keyboard at the bottom takes a bit of getting used to, but the page-turning buttons are cleverly located where they ought to be (the lack of those was a big flaw in the original Sony Reader, that was, however, fixed in the newer version this year). Once you put the Kindle into its book cover, it has the right touch and feel of a book, and is very comfortable in the hand.

The first time starting it up took a little while, but after it had booted I was very pleasantly surprised to find the following on the home page (after going through a few basic introductory help-file pages of how the device works): (a) a letter from Jeff Bezos that started with "Dear Alexander"; (b) all the books and magazines that I had purchased online the previous day; (c) all the blogs that I had previously subscribed to via the Amazon.com Kindle Store. Furthermore the device was pre-configured to be linked to my Amazon.com account so that all shopping from the device was linked to my account and credit card right away without any setup. The promise that is works right out of the box without any kind of setup is actually quite true.

I then proceeded to read a few articles in the Wall Street Journal and it was nice to see that the scroll wheel and cursor sidebar actually worked quite well. I was able to follow links to web pages (courtesy of the built-in web browser). Navigating was very easy with the page-turn buttons in combination with that scroll wheel.

But I couldn't really play nearly enough, since I had a hair dresser appointment and so I took the Kindle with me. As I mentioned above, it was an immediate hit at the hair salon and I ended up purchasing a book wirelessly right there.

After returning home I continued to read a few blogs - including Robert Scoble's review of the Kindle - and then proceeded to test some more functions that the Sony Reader is lacking:

  • I have always been a fan of search (since I can never remember where I've read about stuff before), and so I searched for the most elusive stuff out there - "dark matter" - and promptly found 7 references in the Amber Spyglass (part of Pullman's His Dark Materials series), one entry in the built-in Dictionary, a link to look up "dark matter" on the Wikipedia, and a link to search for it via Google.
  • Where the Sony Reader can only bookmark pages with a very simple bookmark function, the Kindle shines with its ability to either highlight certain paragraphs in a book (by placing a rectangle around the paragraph), to add annotations at any place (via the keyboard), or to store parts of a page or a whole page as a clipping in a separate clipping file that you can access later.
  • The built-in dictionary lookup lets you position the cursor on any line of text and look up all the words on that line simultaneously in the dictionary.
  • I wanted to continue reviewing a recent trade show report that I had received, so I forwarded an e-mail with a Word attachment to the private e-mail address of my Kindle, and was able to read that document in the comfort of my living room without having to balance my laptop on my knees.

All of these features - combined with the ability to go online and buy new eBooks wirelessly from anywhere - easily is worth the $100 extra that the Kindle costs more than the Sony Reader.

And both devices use the same screen technology from eInk, so they both have excellent daylight readability as well as working in dim lighting conditions. Btw, if you have never seen this kind of screen, be ready to be wowed: the text is crystal clear and the resolution is so fine that you can hardly make out the edges of the pixels that are used to render the text. Since it is a grayscale device, it will also render pictures reasonably well (in black&white). However, one thing that requires some getting used to is that the page blinks briefly when you turn it - this is inherent to the screen technology and not a flaw in either device.

There has been much talk about whether the iPhone isn't a better eBook reader than the Kindle. Trust me, it is not. I love my iPhone and carry it with me all the time, and it is great for reading a few web pages here and there and maybe some blogs on Google Reader. But the screen doesn't even come close to having sufficiently high resolution that you would ever want to read an entire book on it, nor is it big enough - you'd go crazy flipping pages every 2.5 seconds. The iPhone is fantastic for what it was designed to do, but reading books isn't part of that scope.

One thing that is presently being criticized by many is that Amazon actually charges for blog subscriptions - what these people don't realize is that the wireless service that is offered with the Kindle is free. There are no monthly fees, no yearly contract, no hassle. However, if you want content delivered over the wireless network, Amazon charges a small fee for the use of the wireless network, and actually splits the revenues with those bloggers - that's only fair.

In addition to all the official features, the Kindle also has a section of functions that are termed "Experimental", which include a Web Browser. So you can easily venture beyond the blogs that are presently offered through the Kindle shop and access any web content out there. However, reading the fine print in the terms & conditions reveals that Amazon reserves the right to charge for such web usage, since you are, of course, using the wireless network for that purpose.

Another fact that might be of interest to international travelers: currently the Kindle doesn't offer roaming outside of the US. You can, however, still get new content onto your Kindle if you are abroad: all you need to do is connect the Kindle to your laptop via USB, download the files from Amazon.com manually and place them on the Kindle via the USB interface (the Kindle appears as a storage medium to the laptop, like a USB stick or iPod). I might be testing this, when we go skiing in Austria this winter...

Overall, I am definitely rather impressed with this device from Amazon and look forward to reading a few books on it on my upcoming travels. There is, of course, plenty of room for feature enhancements and improvements, but it is a great first version and definitely beats the Sony Reader in just about every aspect, so it will be in my briefcase on all future trips.


UPDATE December 5, 2007: I've now owned the Kindle for two weeks and I continue to be impressed by it. So far I've added about 12 more books to my library already, and after "borrowing" my Kindle a few times, my lovely wife has also bought one and we are both looking forward to reading a lot during our upcoming skiing vacation in Austria.

I've also found a few more things over the past two weeks that I wish Amazon had done differenly or simply a few additional feature requests for the next version, and I provided the following feedback to Amazon already via e-mail - repeated here for your enjoyment:


  • The search function doesn’t seem to index all books on my Kindle. I bought the CIA World Factbook 2007 and it is not getting indexed. Unfortunately this totally defeats the purpose of me buying the book. For example, searching for “Linz” does not find the entry for Austria in the CIA World Factbook.

  • I’ve bought plenty of books, blogs, magazines, and newspapers (and I’m using an SD card) and the home-page on the device is getting a bit unwieldy (4 pages already). It would be nice, if I could create folders/directories on the home page to group my books into categories. And it would be necessary to be able to sort different folders by different criteria. For example, I would like to be able to group them into:

    • Periodicals/Subscriptions (blogs, newspapers, magazines) – the content of this folder I would want to sort by Most Recent First

    • Technical Books (sorted by title)

    • Reference Books (dictionaries, CIA factbook, etc)

    • Economcis Books (sorted by title)

    • SciFi Books (sorted by author)

    • Others


  • It is great that I can send PDF and Word docs to my Kindle via my personalized kindle.com e-mail address. But that is not enough. When I place annotations, notes, and highlights in such documents on my Kindle, I now want to be able to e-mail them back to my office e-mail address and I want to see those comments, annotations, notes, and highlights back in the Word or PDF doc so that I can send it to others in the company. This would allow me to use the Kindle for actually reviewing business documents – it would be fantastic!!!

  • How can I get additional blogs on the Kindle? I am happy to pay extra, but I want to be able to enter any RSS feeder URL into my Amazon account and create a Kindle blog feed for it.

  • It would be nice, if Amazon could integrate some Social Networking aspects into the Kindle. How many of my friends are reading books on it? What are they reading? How can I post comments about a book to my blog? How can I tell my friends about comments I have on a book?

Amazon Kindle - the eBook gets connected

A very interesting new gadget is being announced by Amazon today: the "Kindle" is an eBook reader that is always connected to the Internet. Unlike the Sony Reader, which I currently own and have used with great delight on several recent business trips, the Kindle does not require a connection to a PC in order to buy/download new eBooks. The two devices share the same eInk screen technology, which provides for a very crisp display with excellent readability both in bright (i.e. sunlight on the beach) conditions as well as in low-light environments (e.g. airplane during trans-Atlantic flight).

amazonkindle

Looking at the first leaked photos, the Kindle does certainly not look pretty at all (unless you are into 70s retro design). This is in stark contrast with the Sony Reader, which is extremely elegant and regularly gets people excited like the iPod and iPhone when they first see it. However, the Sony Reader has certainly not been met with any business success so far - which is largely due to the fact that the Sony Connect application, which you have to use to buy your eBooks, outright sucks. Therefore, the Kindle has a fair chance to become a success-story, especially due to its always-on connection to the Internet and the ability to buy eBooks directly on the device as well as read blogs or do other connected things. Together these things could more than make up for the design deficiency - it's definitely worth giving it a try, and I plan to purchase mine tomorrow.

Newsweek has a 7 page article about the Kindle based on an interview with Jeff Bezos, CEO and founder of Amazon. There is also plenty of buzz in the blogosphere already: TechCrunch, TechMeme, Gizmondo, Scobleizer (the latter one pointing out a fantastic similarity with an April Fool's joke posting that is worth reading), ...

UPDATE: I just placed my order on Amazon.com with overnight shipping (courtesy of Amazon Prime) and will blog more once I have received the device tomorrow.