WSDL

What's new in XMLSpy Version 2015 Release 3

I'm very excited to announce the new v2015r3 release of XMLSpy today. XMLSpy continues to be the de-facto industry standard for XML Editing and we take that responsibility very seriously by adding support for new standards, improved technologies, as well as features that just make our users' work more productive every release.
This latest version of XMLSpy adds the following new features:
  • Support for XPath 3.1 and XQuery 3.1
  • Significantly extended XPath/XQuery tab
  • Support for Web Services Security and other security extensions
  • Support for XBRL Extensible Enumerations 1.0
  • Support for custom fonts in Output Windows
Improved XPath/XQuery tab in XMLSpy 2015r3
Let me tell you a little bit about each one of those features...



Support for XPath & XQuery 3.1

The RaptorXML engine at the core of XMLSpy now fully supports the updated XPath 3.1 and XQuery 3.1 specifications, which were published as W3 Candidate Recommendations in December of 2014. New capabilities in XPath and XQuery 3.1 include:
  • Maps
  • Arrays
  • Support for JSON: parse-json, json-docs, serialize to JSON
  • Lookup operator “?”
  • Arrow operator “=>”
  • New functions, e.g., sort, contains-token, parse-ietf-date
Maps and arrays increase flexibility and processing speed of XPath and XQuery statements significantly, while JSON support is important as adoption of the standard continues.

Significantly extended XPath/XQuery tab

The XPath/XQuery tab, which was augmented with innovative support for XQuery Update Facility in XMLSpy 2015, just got even more powerful for XSLT and XQuery developers. The new features - shown in the screenshot above - include:
  • Builder mode, offering a list of operators, expressions, and built in functions, which you can insert in your current expression by double clicking. Functions are inserted with their arguments indicated by “#” placeholders, making it easy to build expressions quickly and error-free. You can view a description of each item by hovering your mouse over it in the list. When you’re finished building an expression, click over to Evaluator mode to test the results.
  • Enhanced entry helpers now display the description of built in functions, and then show helpful function and listentrymeter details as you type, speeding development and ensuring accuracy.
  • Ready-to-use code snippets for complex statements such as FLWOR and XQuery Update expressions are provided in the Operator/Expression pane in Builder mode, allowing you to read a description of each and insert the expression at the cursor by double clicking.
  • Nine tabs are even more useful for developing and testing complex expressions. Once you have composed an XPath or XQuery statement on one tab, switching to a new tab lets you build and analyze the results of a new expression – but when you switch back to the previous tab, the expression and results are still there. This allows you to switch back and forth between multiple expressions that you develop side-by-side and incrementally make changes to each one of them, preserving both the expression AND the result for each tab.
     

Support for Web Services Security & other extensions

In response to increasing demand for end-to-end security of Web services transactions, XMLSpy 2015r3 now supports authentication based on the WS-Security (Web Services Security) standard via client certificates and calling Web services via HTTPS.
Published by OASIS, Web Services Security is an extension to the SOAP protocol designed to add security functions such as authentication to SOAP messages themselves for end-to-end security of complex Web services transactions. These measures add to those provided on the transport layer by HTTP security.
New options have been added to the SOAP Request Settings Dialog - shown in the screenshot below - which is accessed via the SOAP menu, allowing you to enable and edit HTTP security settings and WS-Security settings.

Support for XBRL Extensible Enumerations

XML Schema's xs:enumeration feature allows enumerated types to be defined. Such types have a fixed list of allowed values that cannot be changed until the next version of the schema is published.
XBRL projects often require "extensible enumerations", which leave extension taxonomy editors free to augment the list of allowed values for a concept. This is particularly important for allowing enumeration values in multiple languages as well as reusing existing domain hierarchies as fact enumeration values.
XMLSpy 2015r3 now supports extensible enumerations with multi-language labels in the XBRL Taxonomy editor.

For more information on What's New in the other products of the Altova MissionKit desktop developer tools and our Server product family, please take a look at the "What's new" page on our website and at the Altova Blog.

Altova MissionKit 2013

Just in case you missed these announcements last month, here is a quick recap of some of our blog posts about the new major features in the Altova MissionKit 2013:

But there is so much more included in version 2013 of the various developer tools across the entire MissionKit tools suite in terms of new features that we added in direct response to customer feedback:

  • Seamless integration options in Java applications for XMLSpy, MapForce, StyleVision, Authentic
  • Support for embedded XML Schemas in WSDL files
  • Enhanced WSDL documentation options
  • Flexible integration of external programs into XMLSpy
  • Support for CamelCase words in spell checker
  • Option to strip unnecessary whitespace
  • Support for Team Foundation Server MSSCCI Provider for version control systems
  • Table row and column conditions
  • XPath Evaluator extension of XPath Builder
  • Integration with Eclipse 4.2 (adds to support for earlier versions)
  • Support for US GAAP 2012 XBRL taxonomy (adds to support for earlier versions)
  • Support for UML 2.4
  • Support for SysML 1.2
  • Support for displaying .NET properties as UML associations
  • Spell checker for UML model components
  • Print results of directory comparisons in DiffDog
  • Significant performance improvements in DiffDog
  • Authentic browser plug-in for Google Chrome
  • Authentic push installer for browser plug-ins

More information on all of these new features can be found on our "What's New" page

New York International Autoshow

I spent a day at the NY Autoshow this weekend with my son to take a look at the latest concept cars and the newest production cars from the world's largest and most exclusive automobile brands, and to check in on the progress of UIMA, an XML standard that has the potential to one day be used by cars to communicate with the road and with other cars around them.

Being a technology aficionado, I was very impressed to find more evidence of a move to carbon-fiber and aluminum construction evident with many manufacturers this year. Similarly there was are a lot of new developments with respect to electric and hybrid vehicles that could be seen in New York.

Here is a quick gallery of some of my favorite cars at the show:

Mazda Furai Concept Car

Mazda Furai Concept Car

Saleen Raptor

Saleen Raptor

Audi R8

Audi R8

BMW Concept Car

BMW Concept Car

And my favorite of the entire show - and a great example of the use of carbon-fiber and aluminum in a high-end production vehicle - is the Aston Martin DBS:

Aston Martin DB2

Aston Martin DBS

Sadly, a few revolutionary cars that I would have liked to see were absent from the show, such as the Tesla or the Gibbs Aquada. And a few other high-end car manufacturers were also missing, for example the Koenigsegg or the Pagani Zonda.

But there was a flying car on display. Well, at least a prototype of one. You just can't have a car show without a flying car:

I was also looking in vain for evidence of any production applications of UIMA or other similar software approaches that would allow XML to be used by cars to communicate with the road and other cars around them. But that technology still seems to be a few years in the future before it reaches production vehicles, as UIMA is presently being standardized by and OASIS TC.

The exciting thing about UIMA is, of course, that it is not only based on XML, but being described by a specific domain model in XMI (which can be used in the UModel UML Modeling Tool), and contains specific Web Services descriptions in WSDL (which can be viewed in the XMLSpy XML Editor and utilized in our MapForce data integration tool). Last, but not least, there are semantic web implications with respect to knowledge integration in UIMA (which result in RDF and OWL information that can be viewed and processed in our SemanticWorks RDF and OWL editor). I will be following UIMA closely and will report on any progress in this XML Aficionado blog.

More photos can be found in this gallery on my photo website. And for more news from the New York Autoshow, please refer to the various in-depth reviews on Popular Mechanics...