Standards

What's new in XMLSpy Version 2015 Release 3

I'm very excited to announce the new v2015r3 release of XMLSpy today. XMLSpy continues to be the de-facto industry standard for XML Editing and we take that responsibility very seriously by adding support for new standards, improved technologies, as well as features that just make our users' work more productive every release.
This latest version of XMLSpy adds the following new features:
  • Support for XPath 3.1 and XQuery 3.1
  • Significantly extended XPath/XQuery tab
  • Support for Web Services Security and other security extensions
  • Support for XBRL Extensible Enumerations 1.0
  • Support for custom fonts in Output Windows
Improved XPath/XQuery tab in XMLSpy 2015r3
Let me tell you a little bit about each one of those features...



Support for XPath & XQuery 3.1

The RaptorXML engine at the core of XMLSpy now fully supports the updated XPath 3.1 and XQuery 3.1 specifications, which were published as W3 Candidate Recommendations in December of 2014. New capabilities in XPath and XQuery 3.1 include:
  • Maps
  • Arrays
  • Support for JSON: parse-json, json-docs, serialize to JSON
  • Lookup operator “?”
  • Arrow operator “=>”
  • New functions, e.g., sort, contains-token, parse-ietf-date
Maps and arrays increase flexibility and processing speed of XPath and XQuery statements significantly, while JSON support is important as adoption of the standard continues.

Significantly extended XPath/XQuery tab

The XPath/XQuery tab, which was augmented with innovative support for XQuery Update Facility in XMLSpy 2015, just got even more powerful for XSLT and XQuery developers. The new features - shown in the screenshot above - include:
  • Builder mode, offering a list of operators, expressions, and built in functions, which you can insert in your current expression by double clicking. Functions are inserted with their arguments indicated by “#” placeholders, making it easy to build expressions quickly and error-free. You can view a description of each item by hovering your mouse over it in the list. When you’re finished building an expression, click over to Evaluator mode to test the results.
  • Enhanced entry helpers now display the description of built in functions, and then show helpful function and listentrymeter details as you type, speeding development and ensuring accuracy.
  • Ready-to-use code snippets for complex statements such as FLWOR and XQuery Update expressions are provided in the Operator/Expression pane in Builder mode, allowing you to read a description of each and insert the expression at the cursor by double clicking.
  • Nine tabs are even more useful for developing and testing complex expressions. Once you have composed an XPath or XQuery statement on one tab, switching to a new tab lets you build and analyze the results of a new expression – but when you switch back to the previous tab, the expression and results are still there. This allows you to switch back and forth between multiple expressions that you develop side-by-side and incrementally make changes to each one of them, preserving both the expression AND the result for each tab.
     

Support for Web Services Security & other extensions

In response to increasing demand for end-to-end security of Web services transactions, XMLSpy 2015r3 now supports authentication based on the WS-Security (Web Services Security) standard via client certificates and calling Web services via HTTPS.
Published by OASIS, Web Services Security is an extension to the SOAP protocol designed to add security functions such as authentication to SOAP messages themselves for end-to-end security of complex Web services transactions. These measures add to those provided on the transport layer by HTTP security.
New options have been added to the SOAP Request Settings Dialog - shown in the screenshot below - which is accessed via the SOAP menu, allowing you to enable and edit HTTP security settings and WS-Security settings.

Support for XBRL Extensible Enumerations

XML Schema's xs:enumeration feature allows enumerated types to be defined. Such types have a fixed list of allowed values that cannot be changed until the next version of the schema is published.
XBRL projects often require "extensible enumerations", which leave extension taxonomy editors free to augment the list of allowed values for a concept. This is particularly important for allowing enumeration values in multiple languages as well as reusing existing domain hierarchies as fact enumeration values.
XMLSpy 2015r3 now supports extensible enumerations with multi-language labels in the XBRL Taxonomy editor.

For more information on What's New in the other products of the Altova MissionKit desktop developer tools and our Server product family, please take a look at the "What's new" page on our website and at the Altova Blog.

Tablet computers, video, HTML5, and the great Flash debate

Even if you are not always plugged into tech blogs or the latest social media networks, I have a short reading list for you for this weekend. There’s just a fascinating combination of interesting stories all happening in the same 48h period:

  1. HP drops the Slate project (=tablet PC running Windows 7 that was announced at CES last year by Steve Ballmer)
    http://techcrunch.com/2010/04/29/hewlett-packard-to-kill-windows-7-tablet-project/
  2. Microsoft drops the Courier tablet project (=innovative folding screen tablet computer with both hand and pen input)
    http://gizmodo.com/5527442/microsoft-cancels-innovative-courier-tablet-project
  3. HP buys Palm and is rumored to be working on a tablet computer running Palm’s WebOS
    http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/press/2010/100428xa.html
  4. Apple’s CEO Steve Jobs attacks Flash in an open letter on the Apple website and clearly speaks out in support of HTML5 and the H.264 video standard
    http://www.apple.com/hotnews/thoughts-on-flash/
  5. Adobe’s CEO Shantanu Narayen (who?) responds to the Steve Jobs letter in a TV interview with the Wall Street Journal (and offers very weak responses only – mostly cookie cutter style)
    http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2010/04/29/live-blogging-the-journals-interview-with-adobe-ceo/
  6. Microsoft responds to the Apple-Adobe debate on the Internet Explorer Blog and also expresses support for HTML5 and H.264, but – in an attempt to not take sides – also states that “Flash remains an important part of delivering a good consumer experience on today’s web”.
    http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2010/04/29/html5-video.aspx
  7. Apple starts shipping the 3G version of the iPad in the US today
    http://www.apple.com/ipad/

To see all these things unfold in such a short period of time is quite fascinating, and thus far Apple and the iPad are the clear winner here…

Talking of which: according to FedEx my two WiFi+3G iPads are already on the delivery truck today and should arrive at my house before 3pm.

Also, if you are interested in following more of these tech stories unfold in real-time, check out http://techmeme.com/

Electronic health records, HL7, and XML data mapping

The recent appointment of Kathleen Sebelius as Secretary for Health and Human Services yesterday marks another important step in President Obama's drive for health-care reform. As the President has stated numerous times, including during his recent Address to Joint Session of Congress, his goals for health-care reform very clearly include electronic health records:

"Our recovery plan will invest in electronic health records and new technology that will reduce errors, bring down costs, ensure privacy, and save lives."

In essence, electronic health records directly translates to the HL7 family of standards and it is, therefore, important for software developers to be able to integrate HL7 data in their applications swiftly and efficiently. No other tool makes this easier to accomplish and more affordable to do than Altova MapForce.

MapForce is a data mapping and conversion tool that now supports HL7 v2.x EDI standards as well as the new HL7 v3.x XML-based standards and allows a developer to easily map data between HL7 and various other data sources, including relational databases, XML, web services, and even plain text files from legacy systems. Specifically, MapForce makes it easy to map data from an HL7 electronic health record into an in-house relational database.

Specifically, you can now download the MapForce HL7 Installer, which is free for all licensed MapForce customers, and includes all HL7 EDI message formats in various versions so that you can pick and choose the exact transaction and message structure for electronic health records that you need to implement in your organization:

And the best thing about MapForce: once a mapping between any HL7 message and your internal data structures and/or datbases is defined visually in the intuitive user interface, MapForce will auto-generate all the necessary program code in Java or C# that implements this data mapping, so that this code can be integrated into your in-house applications with ease. By doing that, MapForce eliminates the need to write hundreds or thousands of lines of infra-structure code that would otherwise be cumbersome to write, error-prone, and a nightmare to debug.

Using MapForce to auto-generate that data integration code can result in huge cost-savings and improved efficiency, which is critical in today's tough economic environment!

In addition to HL7, MapForce does, of course, also support the ANSI X12 transactions required for HIPAA compliance, so it can be used for all aspects of electronic health-care reform.

For more information, see also this article on HL7 Data Integration on the official Altova Blog.

XBRL and HL7 thoughts

Kurt Cagle has a great new article on his blog on the O'Reilly Community site titled "XBRL Becomes Mandatory - This Should be Interesting", where he writes (emphasis added by me):

"From the IT perspective, the formal adoption of XBRL as a mandatory requirement is likely to have a number of implications, not least of which being a suddenly high demand for XML skilled people in general, and XBRL people in particular, as well as a boon for XBRL service providers and tools vendors. As with the OOXML/ODF controversy of 2007, it is very likely that 2009 will be a banner year for XML technologies in general, as two of the key issues that are highly visible this year - financial transparency within corporations and the streamlining of health care, both involve rich XML standards - XBRL for financial reporting, HL7 v3 for electronic health records."

I couldn't agree more, which is why we released support for both XBRL and HL7 in our recent v2009 product line. Make sure you read Kurt's entire article, as he has some great thoughts and insight on the current economic situation as well.

OOXML vs. ODF - the "battle" is heating up as we get closer to the ISO BRM date

I wrote about the Burton Group's report "What's Up, .DOC?" before on the XML Aficionado blog, and it didn't take long for the ODF Alliance to write a scathing rebuttal to the Burton Group report. Ironically, that rebuttal was published in PDF format, not ODF...

Before we take a look at what happens next, maybe it is time for a short review of the various acronyms and abbreviations that are commonly used in these reports, discussions, and in related blogs:

OOXML Office Open XML is an XML-based file format specification for electronic productivity application documents, such as spreadsheets, charts, presentations, and word processing documents. Originally developed by Microsoft, it is already an Ecma standard and widely used due to its implementation by Microsoft Office 2007. It is currently in the process of being proposed as an ISO standard.
ODF Open Document Format is a file format for electronic office documents, originally developed by Sun for the OpenOffice.org office suite and then later standardized through OASIS and ISO.
ISO International Organization for Standardization
BRM Ballot Resolution Meeting is the ISO process by which comments received during the previous ISO FastTrack vote and letter ballot phase are resolved by the meeting, during which national bodies and the submitting entity (Ecma) will possibly agree on a set of revisions to the originally submitted standard text. The DIS-29500 BRM is scheduled for February 25-29, 2008, in Geneva.
DIS-29500 The official ISO name and standard number for OOXML
OASIS Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards; a non-profit consortium that defines open standards for the global information society
Ecma Originally this was called the European Computer Manufacturers Association, but their new name is Ecma International - European association for standardizing information and communication systems.
XML eXtensible Markup Language as defined by the W3C in 1998. Probably the most important standard of them all, because both OOXML and ODF are built on top of XML. If you don't know it already, you should definitely learn XML... :)

 

So what's new with the OOXML vs. ODF debate now that we are only two weeks away from the ISO BRM? Earlier this week, the Burton Group responded to the ODF Alliance's rebuttal in a series of three postings by Guy Creese on the Collaboration and Content Strategies Blog, and you can find them here: Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3. In this response, the Burton Group addresses each criticism from the ODF Alliance point by point.

Also, Slashdot reported this week on the Ecma response to the ISO comments and the recent blog post from Russel Ossendryver (an open source and ODF advocate) criticizing the Ecma response.

If you prefer some demos over reading thousands of pages of specifications, you may find these videos interesting that have been posted on YouTube recently: a video of Open XML on the iPhone, as well as a video of Native Open XML support on Mac OS X. Both videos show support of OOXML on Apple's platforms, yet Martin Bekkelund (a proponent of Norway's "no" vote on DIS-29500) writes on his blog today about some headaches he's had with OOXML on the Mac and his iPhone. I was curious about his allegation that a .DOCX on the iPhone produces an error message, so I had to try it myself - and I am happy to report that any .DOCX attachment received on my iPhone (running the 1.1.3 software) displays beautifully and works pretty much exactly like it is shown in the YouTube video above.

More commentary and further information can be found on Michael Desmond's blog, as well as in previous OOXML-related posts on this XML Aficionado blog. Also keep in mind that the best way to learn OOXML is to start experimenting with it, and I recently wrote a longer article on Content reuse with Open XML and XSLT to show exactly how easily it can be done using the built-in OOXML support in your favorite XML Editor.

One thing is certain: everybody will be watching the outcome of the ISO BRM very closely...