Sunday, July 14, 2013

Zero-day exploits, spies, and the predictive power of Sci-Fi

Reading the NY Times over coffee this morning, I noticed the article "Nations Buying as Hackers Sell Flaws in Computer Code" which details how nations (and, in particular, their secrete service organizations) are now bidding for and buying zero-day exploits from hackers and security experts worldwide.

Certainly a very timely article, as the world still comes to grips with the evolving role of the NSA and what we've learned in the aftermath of the Snowden leaks. It also reminded me of a Science Fiction series I read in the late Nineties and turn of the century: Tom Clancy's Net Force.

TomClancy's Net Force

Set in 2010 this was a gripping story about a new fictitious FBI division created to combat threats in cyberspace. The storyline quickly evolved from criminal investigations into cyber espionage and cyber warfare. These were the days of the early web and people still used AltaVista as a search engine - so a lot of the ideas in Net Force seemed pretty far out back then.

Interestingly, in the real world, in 2010 the US Army activated their Cyber Command.

And when people talk about Cyberspace in the media today, let's not forget that that term, too, was coined by Sci-Fi authors such as Vernor Vinge and William Gibson in the early Eighties. Like many other geeks of my generation, I devoured those books back then.

Musing about these things over coffee on a beautiful Sunday morning reminded me of an interview I gave to Erin Underwood at the Underwords blog a year ago, in which we talked about the importance of Sci-Fi for young adults and the oftentimes predictive powers of Sci-Fi literature…

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