Friday, September 26, 2014

Pixelstick

In December last year I contributed to the Kickstarter campaign for Pixelstick - an interesting new photographic tool for light painting. When our Pixelstick arrived in early September, it was immediately clear that it would need to go to New York with my son when he went back to college.

Calvin is a photography student at NYU's Tisch School and so I knew he would put the device to some creative use... and indeed he just posted a "How to" video on YouTube:



For more information on Pixelstick go to www.thepixelstick.com

For more updates on Calvin's work, follow him on Twitter @EpicFalkon or check out his website discover.calvinphoto.pro

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

XQuery Update Facility in XMLSpy

A really cool new feature in XMLSpy 2015 is the interactive XQuery Update Facility support, which lets you make changes to XML instance documents in a programmatic way - using XQuery statements - that exceed the typical regular expression based Find/Replace capabilities by far. The XQuery Update Facility specification provides a mechanism to insert nodes, delete notes, and modify nodes within instance documents. In XMLSpy 2015 you can now apply these updates either to the current file, all open files, all files in a project, or to entire directories.

This video explains the most important XQuery Update Facility commands and demonstrates how easy it is to put the power of XQuery Update Facility to work for you:



The new XQuery Update Facility support is one of the many new features introduced in the new Altova version 2015 product line last week, which includes new versions of XMLSpy, MapForce, all the other MissionKit tools, and all Altova server products.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Introducing MobileTogether - Build mobile in-house solutions faster

It's about time that I start talking about our next major product here: Altova MobileTogether is an exciting new cross-platform mobile environment that lets you build in-house mobile solutions for your workforce much faster and more productively than any other mobile cross-platform method out there. You can use MobileTogether to bring your in-house data — be it in SQL databases, XML, available as web services, etc. — to your employees on the device of their choice, be it business intelligence dashboards, elegant enterprise forms, or any other business processes from graphs for sales analytics to monitoring of business-critical data.


There are, of course, many ways to develop mobile solutions, and for external customer-facing apps the native platform approach or other multi-platform SDKs may make sense. But for in-house solutions the math just doesn't work. You need to be able to build these in a few days rather than weeks or months in order to stay on budget.


Monday, September 22, 2014

New XBRL Formula Editor in XMLSpy

I'm very excited about all the new features in XMLSpy 2015, and in particular about the new XBRL Formula Editor, which now lets you build formulas more intuitively using a XBRL Table Linkbase layout preview. The XBRL Table Linkbase specification provides a mechanism for taxonomy authors to define a tabular layout of facts. The resulting tables can be used for both presentation and data entry. In XMLSpy 2015 we use these tables as a way to specify variables in XBRL Formula definitions.

However, XBRL Table Linkbase is a fairly young specification, so not many published XBRL taxonomies include Table Linkbase definitions yet. Please see my previous blog post, where I have demonstrated how to add a Table Linkbase to an existing XBRL extension taxonomy.

Once we have a taxonomy with a Table Linkbase attached to it, we can then proceed to create some assertions or calculations using XBRL Formula Editor. In this video, I will demonstrate how to do this using a recent SEC filing as an example instance:



The new XBRL Formula Editor is one of the many new features introduced in the new Altova version 2015 product line last week, which includes new versions of XMLSpy, MapForce, all the other MissionKit tools, and all Altova server products.

Sunday, September 21, 2014

XBRL Table Linkbase Editor and Layout Preview

This week we launched our new Altova version 2015 product line, including new versions of XMLSpy, MapForce, all the other MissionKit tools, and all Altova server products.

One of the cool new features in XMLSpy 2015 is the real-time XBRL Table Linkbase layout preview. The XBRL Table Linkbase specification provides a mechanism for taxonomy authors to define a tabular layout of facts. The resulting tables can be used for both presentation and data entry.

However, XBRL Table Linkbase is a fairly young specification, so not many published XBRL taxonomies include Table Linkbase definitions yet. This is where XMLSpy can greatly help: in this video I will give you a quick demonstration of how to add a Table Linkbase to an existing XBRL extension taxonomy, using an XBLR filing that was submitted to the SEC as an example:



Learn how the graphical XBRL Table Linkbase editor in XMLSpy makes it easy to define XBRL tables for the presentation of multi-dimensional XBRL data. You can determine whether your table produces the desired results in the real-time XBRL Table layout preview, which is new starting in XMLSpy 2015.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

How to download and process SEC XBRL Data Directly from EDGAR

Earlier this year I presented a webinar for XBRL.US where I demonstrated how you can use the vast number of XBRL filings that have been submitted by public companies to the SEC and are available for free to download from the SEC's EDGAR system:



Since then I've occasionally received requests for the slides used in that webinar, and the slides are available on SlideShare now.

In addition, several people wanted to see and reuse the complete Python scripts that I demonstrated in the webinar, so I have now uploaded those and published them in a new GitHub repository:

https://github.com/altova/sec-xbrl

These scripts are available under an Apache 2 license and require Python 3 as well as RaptorXML+XBRL Server installed on your machine. For more details, please see the README file published on GitHub.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Computer brain surgery or How to performa a RAIDectomy

I have an old 2010 Mac Pro in my home office that is my main photo editing machine (using Adobe Photoshop CC and Lightroom 5). It also serves as a remote desktop terminal to my office PC. It has 2 Intel Xeon CPUs with 6 cores each running at 2.93 GHz and 32GB of RAM, so even by today's standards, 4 years later, it is quite a powerful machine.

At least in theory it should be. Back when I bought the machine I thought it would be a good idea to get the Apple RAID card and 4 drives with 2TB each and set them up in a RAID 5 array for data protection, giving me a total usable 5TB of disk space, which I  set up as a 2TB boot drive and a 3TB drive for data.

Apple RAID Card and Drives
Apple RAID Card and Drives

That RAID card, however has been giving me nothing but trouble in those four years, and it got so bad this summer that it was time for a radical move: RAIDectomy!

Sunday, September 7, 2014

The (Broken) Promise Of Wearables

This week the Moto 360 became available and sold out in record time. Next week Apple is rumored to introduce their iWatch along with the next generation iPhone. And Samsung just announced their next generation Gear watch last week that is expected to ship at the same time as the Galaxy Note Edge.

It is clear that Wearables hold a lot of excitement and a lot of promise, and obviously capture people’s imagination. But let’s pause for a moment first, and talk about past experiences with Wearables:

Wearables on a table